Skip to main content

Table 1 Studies included in the review (Full length table is in Additional file 1)

From: Barriers and facilitators to adherence to group exercise in institutionalized older people living with dementia: a systematic review

Author and year Type of exercise Length of program Sample details (N) Adherence rate Main Barriers Key Facilitators
Lazowski et al. 1999 [25] Strength, balance, flexibility and mobility training 4 months
45-min sessions, thrice a week
Residents in long term care incl. Those with dementia (N = 96) Completed: N = 68 (N = 71%), from those, attendance to exercise units averaged 86% for the FFLTC and 79% for the ROM classes • Seated motion exercises not challenging enough
• Lack of space
• Timing of exercise during other activities
• Self-paced exercise tailored to the level of abilities
• Smaller classes of (3–5 people), more volunteers to assist
Rolland et al. 2007 [5] Walk, strength, balance and flexibility training 12 months
1 h session
twice a week
Residents of nursing homes with AD (N = 67 experimental group; N = 67 control group)
Recruited in total N = 134
residents
Of the 110 exercisers who completed the study (84%), mean rate of attendance
was 33.2 ± 25.5% of the 88 sessions
• Behavior disorders (40%)
• Unwillingness to continue (35%)
• Acute disease (15%)
• Relationship between the therapist and participants
• Quality of care
Galik et al. 2009 [21] Functional activities and exercise for older people with dementia Not described Nursing home residents with dementia
Recruited: N = 7
Not reported • Behavioral issues (anxiety, agitation)
• Medication
• Communication breakdown
• Fear of injury
• Understanding interests and values of residents
• Self-paced activities
• Availability of staff
• Families involved
Resnick et al. 2009 [22] Self-efficacy based care intervention classes 6 weeks Residents of nursing homes total N-486
(N = 256 experimental treatment group vs. N = 231 control group)
At 4 months follow up: N = 413
At 12 months follow up N = 326
After 12 months N = 168 in treatment group (66%), N = 158 control group (68%) • Understaffing/low levels of staffing • Self-efficacy based motivation
• Joining exercise for residents
Frandin et al. 2009 [8] Individually tailored activities 12 weeks
93 min a week
Personalised activity programme
Nursing home residents (N = 322), 170 intervention group, 152 control,
At 3 months follow up: N = 266 residents
At 6 months follow up: N = 241 residents
After 3 months N = 143 intervention group (84%) vs. N = 123 control (81%) group, drop out: 27 intervention group vs. 29 control group • Time specific nature of intervention
• Inability to continue exercise themselves
• Illness and hospital admissions
• Intervention that supports personal skills, self-confidence
• Personalized goals
• Constant support
• Supervised PA
Finnegan et al. 2015 [13] Group exercise sessions including walking and dancing 12 months
twice a week
Nursing home residents incl. People with CI (N = 428) 302 subjects out of 428 completed the study (71%),
attendance rate for group exercises was 54,2%
• Depression and frailty
• Lack of staff
• Socio-economic status
• Perception of exercise benefits
• Presence of a dedicated staff
• Enjoyment and social engagement
Fleiner et al. 2015 [24] Strength and endurance program 2 weeks
4 - day structuring sessions each 40 min
People with dementia hospitalized in a hospital, targeted (N = 130) Not reported • Necessity of exercise session organization according to hospital routines • Flexible exercise schedules that consider mood variations and actual motivation
Olsen et al. 2015 [23] Balance and strength exercise
Small groups
Individually adapted
Supervised
10 weeks
3 sessions a week
50–60 min each
8 nursing home residents with dementia (N = 12)
Completed: N = 8
On average 77% attendance rate, ranging from 47% (2 subjects) to 100% (1 subject) • Functional limitations
• Nursing home routines
• Challenging and enjoyable exercise
• Voluntary participation
• Instructor skills, engagement, relationship to clients
Tobiasson et al. 2015 [26] Exergames (videogaming with exercise)
3 h 2–3 times a week
12 months
3 h, 2–3 times a week
Residents of dementia special care units (N = 22) Not reported • Caregivers’ participation limited
• Design issues - handling the video game systems
• Enjoyment from playing games and competition
• Embedding activity in care giver routine